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SSAT - Private High School
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AP Exams - Advanced Placement
CLEP Exams - College Credits

NCLEX - Nursing Exams
FE Exam - Engineering
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GRE - Graduate School
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MCAT - Medical School

 
 
 
 
 

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  • You can study hard during the few months before the exam, and review everything in the weeks leading up to the test date, but it's time to rest and eliminate stress in the last few days prior to taking an exam. Not only read the syllabus, but study the grading system that's going to be used for each class. Also, get a bulletin board for your bedroom, to put above your desk. Post the course syllabus for each class on the bulletin board, and highlight deadlines, as well as the requirements for the course. Professors like to follow the texts they assign, so make an effort to read all of the assigned material. Ask yourself questions about what you're learning, and limit your study time to short intervals of 30 minutes to an hour. After reading a lot or solving a lot of problems, your brain needs to relax. It's like a mini-cramming session every day, and the chapter you just read will be reinforced by what the professor has to say. After class, review the main points that were written on the blackboard. If the teacher took the time to highlight certain sections of the text, you can bet you'll see the same information posed as questions on either the midterm, or final exam.


    What Are AP Exams?
    AP Biology Exam
    AP Biology Notes
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    AP Biology Study Guide
    AP Chemistry Exam
    AP Psychology Review
    AP Psychology Practice Tests
    AP Psychology Study Guide
    Physics Study Guide
    US History
    AP World History Study Guide
    Physics Syllabus
    Chemistry Syllabus
    Biology Study Guide
    Chemistry Study Guide
    Economics Notes
    English Study Guide
    Geography Study Guide
    History Notes
    Math Study Guide
    Physics Study Guide
    Biology Syllabus
    Economics Syllabus


    Exams are a huge portion of your final grade, so you need to become an expert test-taker. The main thing is to know what to expect. Every professor will let you know in their own particular way which questions they will be asking on the big exams. They often raise the pitch of their voice when stressing certain points they're making. By determining ahead of time what will be asked on an exam, you can trim down the amount of information you need to learn. Be sure to get a full night's sleep before any major test. Even more than studying for the test, you're going to need your full mental capacity, refreshed and recharged by sleep. On the test day itself, arrive early, and pick a seat near the windows, in order to get good sunlight and a bit of oxygen. Take time at the beginning of the test to read the instructions carefully. For multiple-choice tests, look at the number of questions and the number of minutes you have. If there are more minutes than questions, you have a bit over a minute for each. However, if there are more questions than minutes, you better scramble, as you have under a minute to answer each question. You need to be around question #10 at ten minutes in, or you're falling behind.

    Eliminate outlying answers right at the start. Average all numbers, and look for tips in the question that point you to the answer. Trust your instincts, and don't change your answers on a second pass. If the first answer, A, is a little too obvious, it's probably a decoy. Test makers like to group the real answers with confusing second choices nearby. Look for patterns in words in the vocabulary section. Read every question fresh, word by word, like a hawk, and pay attention. Finally, if it's a written-answer test, know the point values of each question, and complete the most valuable ones first. If you're falling behind in a class, and the lectures seem too dense, get help before the situation becomes impossible. Some students are too shy to admit difficulty, or just don't realize that free tutoring may be available. You can study all you want, but in order to achieve top grades, you need to go further than remembering facts, and get a firm grasp on the material.


    Math Review

    In the math section, saving just a few seconds on each test question can lead to a much higher math score. I like to start with addition and subtraction, as you can waste precious moments on each question and make careless errors.

    Algebra
    Geometry
    Trigonometry
    Calculus
    Statistics


    SAT TEST vs ACT EXAM

    SAT vs the ACT
    SAT Math vs ACT Math
    SAT Writing Vs. ACT English
    ACT Reading Vs. SAT Reading
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    SAT Math Section
    SAT Reading Section


     
    ABOUT THE SAT TEST
    A Complete Explanation of the SAT SAT Rules and Regulations
    Free Old Official SAT Practice Tests
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    SAT Tips and Tricks
    Best SAT Flashcards
    SAT Study Guide
    Understanding SAT Scores
    What Are SAT Subject Tests?
    Register for SAT Subject Tests
    How Long is the SAT with Breaks?
    Cancel Your SAT Registration
    Cancel Your SAT Scores
    Guess Strategically on SAT Math
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    SAT MATH
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    SAT VERBAL
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    ABOUT THE ACT EXAM
    What is the ACT? A Complete Explanation of the Test.
    ACT Sample Questions
    Understanding ACT Scores
    How Long is the ACT with Breaks?
    Cancel ACT Test Registration
    Cancel Your ACT Scores
    Time Management Tips



    ACT MATH
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    ACT ENGLISH
    Author Main Points
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    ACT SCIENCE
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    CLEP EXAMS are a credit-by-examination program offering 33 exams that you can take to earn credits that are accepted at almost 3,000 colleges and universities, therby saving you tuition costs as well as time to graduation.

    English:
    American Literature
    Writing Skills
    English Literature

    Languages:
    French
    German
    Spanish

    Social Sciences:
    US Government
    US History
    Human Development
    Educational Psychology
    Psychology
    Sociology
    Macroeconomics
    Microeconomics
    Ancient History
    Modern History

    Science:
    Biology
    Chemistry

    Math:
    Algebra
    Geometry
    Precalculus
    Calculus

    Business:
    Finance
    Accounting
    Business Law
    Management
    Marketing


    One of the easiest ways to improve your grades is to choose the right classes. I don't mean the easiest classes, in fact, but the classes that you find interesting. Nothing spells success like attending all your classes, even the 8:00 ones, and paying full attention. You can't pay attention if you're falling asleep, either from too much partying the night before, or simply from boredom. Just sitting in the class, front and center, in the first row if you can get it, and listening with awareness will help you absorb the materials. If you can't get motivated (or even excited) to learn from your instructors, you may need to take a step back, and get in touch with the reasons why you're in college in the first place.

    Every professor has a different personality, and system for running their classes, so make an effort to learn what the professor wants. Not only read the syllabus, but study the grading system that's going to be used for the class. Also, get a bulletin board for your bedroom, to put above your desk. Post the course syllabus for each class on the bulletin board, and highlight deadlines, as well as the requirements for the course. You're not going to get all A's if you miss deadlines, and fail to complete assignments. Go a step further at all times; type everything you write, and print it out on decent paper.

    Professors like to follow the texts they assign. It's to supplement their lectures, and discussions from class. You can't skimp on buying textbooks, but you may be able to get the previous edition as a used book on Amazon or Alibris. Read all of the assigned material, twice. Sounds obvious, right, but who really does that? I'll tell you who, people that get 99% scores on exams. When your professor assigns a given chapter, read the whole darn thing, including the opening vignettes, the case studies, tables and exhibits. At the same time, highlight parts of the text that you feel are the most critical. For example, if vocabulary is vital, the textbook will let you know that by having terms and their definitions printed in the margins of every chapter.

    If you're falling behind in a class, and the lectures seem too dense, get help before the situation becomes impossible. Some students are too shy to admit difficulty, or just don't realize there is free tutoring available. You can study all you want, but in order to achieve the grades you want, you need to go further than remembering facts, and get a firm grasp on the material.

    Try to get organized. It's one thing to set aside time to study in the evening, but do you know what you want to accomplish, and have goals to reach, before deciding to quit? Ask yourself questions about what you're learning, like you were writing quizzes for your classmates to take the next day. Study in short intervals of 30 to 60 minutes. After reading a lot or solving a lot of problems, your brain needs to relax for a bit, but don't let the breaks dawdle beyond 10 minutes or so. Further, review your textbook briefly before every class, not just before exams. It's like a mini-cramming session every day, and the chapter you just read will be reinforced by what the professor has to say. Also, if you have most of the lesson plan in your head, you don't have to take notes, freeing up your attention to listen more carefully. After class, review the main points that were written on the blackboard, or shown as slides. If the teacher took the time to highlight certain sections of the text, you can bet you'll see the same information posed as questions on either the midterm, or final exam.


    Advanced Placement Exams (AP Exam)

    You usually take AP exams after you've just completed a course in the relevant subject. A good grade on an AP exam may earn college credit or advanced placement in that subject in college. For example, if you score well on the AP English Literature exam, you may not have to take a basic English course in college.


    College Level Exam Program (CLEP Test)

    CLEP Exams give you the opportunity to earn college credit in different subjects by examination. Not every colleges offer credit based on CLEP tests, and different colleges may offer different amounts of credit for the same test, so do your research. Check out detailed information about the CLEP, getting the college credit you deserve for what you already know.


    Graduate Record Exam (GRE Test)

    Many students planning to attend graduate school take both the GRE General Test as well as Subject Tests. The GRE Exam measures your verbal, quantitative, and analytical skills. Alternatively, Subject Tests probe your knowledge in specific subject areas. It is advised to take a Subject Test related to your undergraduate major. These exams are given three times a year, in October, November, and April.


    Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT Test)

    If you're planning to apply to graduate business programs, you'll be required to take the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT). This tests your verbal, mathematical, and analytical writing abilities. Actual testing takes approximately four hours.


    Law School Admission Test (LSAT Test)

    The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) is required by law schools approved by the American Bar Association. The LSAT exam focuses on reading comprehension, and logical reasoning. You're given a 35-minute writing sample section at the end of the test. This writing sample is not scored, but copies are sent to all law schools to which you apply.


    Medical College Admission Test (MCAT Test)

    The Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) is a multiple-choice exam that measures your knowledge of science as well as skills, such as problem solving and critical thinking. The test is made up of four sections: verbal reasoning, physical sciences, biological sciences, and writing. You will be required to craft an essay for the writing sample section within a timed period. Expect to spend more than five hours at the testing center, with short breaks throughout the session.


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