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Architecture Courses

Architects are responsible for designing houses, factories, office buildings, and other large structures. Architects can be commissioned to design anything from a single room to an entire complex of buildings or public housing project. In some cases, architects may provide various predesign services, such as feasibility and environmental impact studies, site selection, cost analyses, and design requirements.

The architects' plans show the building's appearance and details of its construction. These plans include drawings of the structural system, air-conditioning, heating, and ventilating systems, electrical systems and plumbing. In developing designs, architects must follow state and local building codes, zoning laws, fire regulations, and easy access to buildings for people who are disabled.

Architects use computer-aided design and drafting (CADD) and building information modeling (BIM) for creating designs and construction drawings. However, hand-drawing skills are still required, especially during the conceptual stages of a project and when an architect is at a construction site. As construction continues, architects may visit building sites to ensure that contractors follow the design, adhere to schedule, use specified materials, and meet quality standards.

A recent shift in architectural thought has prompted architecture schools to focus building design more on the environment. Sustainability in architecture was pioneered by Frank Lloyd Wright, Buckminster Fuller, and by green architects such as Ian McHarg and Sim Van der Ryn. Concepts include passive solar building design, greener roof designs, biodegradable materials, and more attention to a structure's energy usage.


Mechanical Engineering
Cutting Forces
Mechanics of Machining
Velocity Analysis
Degrees of Freedom
Fatigue
Mohr's Cirlce
Von-Mises Stress
Vibration
design and manufacturing i
design and manufacturing ii
toy design
intro to robotics
optics
sail and yacht design
direct thermal solar


Aircraft Design, Aerospace
aerospace engineering 1
thermal energy
automatic control
aerodynamics
structural mechanics
aircraft control
astrodynamics
human factors engineering
propulsion systems
space propulsion
ionized gases
systems engineering
satellite engineering
aircraft systems engineering
bio-inspired structures


Architecture
environmental design
architectural design
glass houses
contemporary architecture
building technology
energy flow in buildings
structural design
historic structures
construction materials
structural systems
natural lighting
Analysis of Beam
Method of Joints
Method of Sections
Mohr's Cirlce
Von-Mise Stress
Theories of Failure


Materials Science
intro to materials science
materials processing
polymer engineering
solid state chemistry
materials in human experience
fracture and fatigue
welding and joining
physical metallurgy
magnetics
photonic materials
electrochemical processing
mechanics of plastics
magnets


Nuclear Engineering
Kalina Cycle
Thermal Power Plant
applied nuclear physics
engineering of nuclear systems
nuclear reactor safety
nuclear fuel
nuclear reactors
medical imaging
plasma physics
superconducting magnets
geiger counters
Automotive Engineering
Diesel Engine
Diesel vs Petrol
Manual Transmission
Differential
Slip Differential
Fuel Cell Technology
Gear Design
gas and diesel engines


Thermo-dynamics
Refrigerator
Heat Transfer
Thermodynamics 1
Thermodynamics 2
Fluid Dynamics 1
Fluid Dynamics 2
Turbulence


Turbines
Gas Turbine
Steam Turbine
Wind Turbine
Francis Turbine
Turbomachinery
Pelton Turbine
Kaplan Turbine
Centrifugal Pump
Centrifugal Pump 2
Steam Turbine


Electric Motors
DC Motor
Brushless DC Motor
Alternator
Single Phase Motor
3 Phase Motor
RMF - 1P Motor
RMF - 3P Motor


Electrical Engineering
electromagnetism 1
solid state circuits
circuits and electronics
electromagnetics
circuits
power electronics
photovoltaics - solar energy
electromagnetics
antennas and signals
electric machines
nanoelectronics
superconductivity


Computer Science
intro to algorithms
artificial intelligence
JAVA programming
Python
programming languages
computer systems 1
database systems
computer graphics
network security
computer systems security
natural language processing
machine learning
intro to C language


Civil Engineering
soil behavior
waste containment
soil mechanics
environmental chemistry
groundwater hydrology
aquatic chemistry
water quality control
atmospheric chemistry
wastewater treatment
environmental microbiology


Passive Solar Architecture

Passive solar design takes advantage of a building’s site, climate, and materials to minimize energy use. A well-designed passive solar home first reduces heating and cooling loads through energy-efficiency strategies and then meets those reduced loads in whole or part with solar energy. Because of the small heating loads of modern homes it is very important to avoid oversizing south-facing glass and ensure that south-facing glass is properly shaded to prevent overheating and increased cooling loads in the spring and fall.

A passive solar home collects heat as the sun shines through south-facing windows and retains it in materials that store heat, known as thermal mass. The share of the home’s heating load that the passive solar design can meet is called the passive solar fraction, and depends on the area of glazing and the amount of thermal mass. The ideal ratio of thermal mass to glazing varies by climate. Well-designed passive solar homes also provide daylight all year and comfort during the cooling season through the use of night-time ventilation.


Architecture Department Rankings - Undergraduate

There are typically three main steps to becoming a licensed architect: completing a bachelor's degree in architecture, gaining relevant experience through a paid internship, and passing the Architect Registration Examination. In all states, earning a bachelor's degree in architecture is typically the first step to becoming an architect. Most architects earn their degree through a 5-year Bachelor of Architecture degree program. Many earn a master's degree in architecture, which can take 1 to 5 additional years.

A typical bachelor's degree program includes courses in architectural history and theory, building design with an emphasis on computer-aided design and drafting (CADD), structures, construction methods, professional practices, and math. Currently, 35 states require that architects hold a degree in architecture from one of the 122 schools of architecture accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB). State licensing requirements can be found at the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB).

All state architectural registration boards require architecture graduates to complete a 3-year long paid internship before they may sit for the Architect Registration Examination. Most new graduates complete their training period by working at architectural firms through the NCARB that guides students through the internship process. Some states allow a portion of the training to occur in the offices of employers in related careers, such as engineers and general contractors. Architecture students who complete internships while still in school can count some of that time toward the 3-year training period.

 1. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) - Cambridge, MA
 2. California Institute of Technology (Caltech) - Pasadena, CA
 3. Stanford University - Stanford, CA
 4. University of California Berkeley - Berkeley, CA
 5. Cornell University - Ithaca, NY
 6. Princeton University - Princeton, NJ
 7. University of Michigan - Ann Arbor, MI
 8. Harvey Mudd College - Claremont, CA
 9. Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology - Terre Haute, IN
10. United States Military Academy - West Point, NY
11. Bucknell University - Lewisburg, PA
12. Cal Poly San Luis Obispo - San Luis Obispo, CA
13. The Cooper Union - New York, NY
14. Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University - Daytona Beach, FL
15. Georgia Institute of Technology - Atlanta, GA
16. University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign - Champaign, IL
17. Carnegie Mellon University - Pittsburgh, PA
18. Purdue University - West Lafayette, IN
19. University of Texas Austin - Austin, TX
20. University of Wisconsin - Madison, WI

    Source: US News, Forbes, and Bloomberg

Engineering & Computer Jobs

Architects held about 128,800 jobs in 2017. The median annual wage for architects was $76,930 in May 2017. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $46,600, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $129,810. Architects are expected to be needed to make plans and designs for the construction and renovation of homes, offices, retail stores, and other structures. Many school districts and universities are expected to build new facilities or renovate existing ones. In addition, demand is expected for more healthcare facilities as the US population ages and as more people use healthcare services.

Interns in architectural firms may help design part of a project. They may help prepare architectural documents and drawings, build models, and prepare construction drawings on CADD. Interns may also research building codes and write specifications for building materials, installation criteria, the quality of finishes, and other related details. Licensed architects take the documents that interns produce, make edits to them, finalize plans, and then sign and seal the documents.


Links below list current openings:Starting Salary
(up to)
10 Year Salary
(up to)
Aerospace Engineers$89,260$124,550
Aircraft Mechanics$39,300$71,780
Android Apps$84,350$97,900
Architects$69,760$104,970
Biotechnology$70,900$129,510
Chemists$66,040$106,310
Civil Engineers$72,120$104,420
Electrical Engineers$78,900$115,240
Environmental Engineers$72,590$106,230
Graphic Design$49,300$58,000
Industrial Engineering$70,630$100,980
Maintenance Technician$63,230$73,810
Linux/Perl/C++$79,920$95,350
Mechanical Engineers$63,230$94,690
.NET Developer$88,620$108,000
Network Analysts$65,230$91,550
Robotics $82,160$92,550
Solar Energy$81,050$104,930
Software Development$79,920$95,250
Surveying $23,640$43,140
SWIFT, iOS$85,400$110,720
Technical Writers$60,850$91,720
Urban Planners$58,940$86,880
EMPLOYERS:     Post Jobs     Search Resumes



EMPLOYERS:

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Engineering Jobs
(updated hourly)
Starting
(up to)
Aerospace Engineers$89,260
Aircraft Mechanics$39,300
Android Apps$84,350
Architects$69,760
Biotechnology$70,900
Chemists$66,040
Civil Engineers$72,120
Electrical Engineers$78,900
Environmental Engineers$72,590
Graphic Design$49,300
Industrial Engineering$70,630
Maintenance Technician$63,230
Mechanical Engineers$63,230
.NET Developer$88,620
Network Analysts$65,230
Project Management$68,100
Robotics $82,160
Solar Energy$81,050
Software Development$79,920
Surveying $23,640
SWIFT, iOS$85,400
Technical Writers$60,850
Urban Planners $58,940
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This website is not affiliated with any educational institution, and all trademarks are exclusive property of the respective owners. College Inspector is the work of a group of Thai students in Bangkok, using info from the US Department of Education, Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS). If any stats are incorrect, please contact us with the right data.

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